A dog walk haven at Ferry Point Park

The Chesapeake Heritage & Visitor Center and Ferry Point Park are located at 425 Piney Narrows Rd Chester, MD (Kent Narrows). This a good place for a dog walk and/or bag lunch if you are driving through or visiting Kent Island. As is the case with similar parks on Kent Island, such as Terrapin Park on the Bay, there is no fishing, coolers, alcohol or swimming allowed. The visitor center has art exhibits and a lot of great info about the area.


Jonas Green Park

Officially known as Jonas and Anne Catharine Green Park, this small but important park on the Severn River features a picnic area, a fishing pier and a beach for kayak and canoe boat launching. This little park has big views: the U.S. Naval Academy, Naval Academy Bridge and the Severn River Bridge. It sits next to the Severn River Inn, a popular and pricey restaurant, and rates as one of the best land views for the annual Blue Angels show during commissioning week in May at the U.S. Naval Academy.

See Jonas Green Park: A Hidden Gem from Visit Annapolis.

Hiking, Biking and Benches: Bacon Ridge

Bacon Ridge Phase 3 trail area: Video above features hiking on the paths, some bikers and a bench with an elevated overlook.

From AA County: Bacon Ridge Natural Area in the South River Greenway is 630 acres of permanently protected land through a conservation easement between Anne Arundel County, Maryland Environmental Trust, and Scenic Rivers Land Trust.

From AllTrails: Get to know this 5.9-mile loop trail near Crownsville, Maryland. Generally considered a moderately challenging route, it takes an average of 2 h 21 min to complete. This is a very popular area for hiking, mountain biking, and trail running, so you’ll likely encounter other people while exploring. The trail is open year-round and is beautiful to visit anytime. Dogs are welcome, but must be on a leash.

Hunting with a permit is also available in season.


Greenbury Point Conservation Area: I love the Navy

Many of us have a soft spot in our heart for the United States Navy. Personally, I come from a Navy family, not to the extent of others I know, but it is a legacy just the same. My grandfather was a Navy man who fought in WWII as a marine engineer, piloting landing craft in Saipan. My father joined when he was 17. His cousin graduated from the Academy. An uncle on each side of my immediate family served. Three of my cousins served. I didn’t sign up, but as a kid growing up in Annapolis, I played multiple sports in youth programs at the Academy and at the Naval Station (as it was called then). Today, I enjoy watching rugby games at the new Greenbury Point fields – cheering on when they crush their opponents with superior fitness and skills. It should go without saying that I am supportive of the Academy golf program, and even played a round on the current course when I was invited by a neighbor (but, keep reading). And who doesn’t think the Blue Angels are an inspiring sight for families every year?

So, there it is. I love the Navy. They protect us and without them, there would not be freedom for our nation. If the Naval Academy was not in Annapolis, our capital would be a sleepy colonial Maryland town that comes alive each year for three months with state business.

This whole Greenbury Point Conservation Area issue is simply a Naval Academy Golf Association plan that doesn’t float. It doesn’t work, for all the reasons already discussed in the press and on social media and there is no point in listing them here once again. The conservation area should not be replaced with a second Navy golf course of any size, period.

What does work, instead of a second golf course, is taking what is already a long-established nature preserve and making it better. The conservation area is already the complete package: Protected by Federal and State laws, widely used for outdoor recreation, has park benches set all along the expansive shoreline, has a Nature Center that explains the wild ecology all over the Point, and the preserve currently has the quiet and loyal support of thousands of civilians and military personnel from all walks of life and ranks.

What’s next for Greenbury Point Conservation Area? All it takes is some imagination and very little budget to support this wild refuge: minimal landscaping and grass cutting to keep the ticks away from the park benches, a graded access road and trails to keep them puddle free, and perhaps a little more appreciation and protection by all the levers of government, County, State and Federal. A few observation towers would be nice but are not essential to enjoy the wide and breathtaking views of the Chesapeake Bay and Annapolis.

Let’s please turn the page on this issue and march in unison into the future, so all our families can simply enjoy nature’s bounty here in Annapolis.

Video and photos credit: Mike Robinson

Greenbury Point Conservation Area: A Sanctuary

The days of pre-vaccine Covid were a severe lock-down. A physical and mental lock-down. We were told to hide from each other and our normal lives. We all had to find safe places to find solace and peace during these stressful and uncertain times. For many of us, Greenbury Point Conservation Area became that sanctuary.

Greenbury Point Conservation Area is not a new sanctuary. It has been a nature preserve for decades, protected by the Sikes Act of 1960 and critical area laws in Maryland. There is well-documented and storied history, preserved by the U.S. Navy for the pubic, so we may learn about the importance of this place. With this in mind, many were shocked when information was recently leaked that the Naval Academy Golf Association has been privately working on plans to bulldoze these 200 acres of pristine wilderness and nature trails for a second golf course, adjacent to the current one, reserved for Navy use only.

For years, this beautiful outdoor space has been loved and actively used for recreation by residents of Anne Arundel County, the City of Annapolis, Navy personnel of all stripes and midshipmen who use this for daily fitness routines. How can it be that an area protected by law and used by countless civilians and military members could be leveled and walled off for golfers?

Many of us have played golf – and while it is a fine game, this is not a debate about the game of golf or any Navy sport. This conversation is about access and health – for all of us and our surroundings – and preserving this very unique treasure for today and future generations. As aptly described in CNET, exercising outdoors can have an effect on your brain similar to meditation: “… something as simple as going for a walk or bike ride outdoors can have an immediate profound effect that can help give tremendous relief because it invites the mind to shift spontaneously without any effort, into this meditative like state…”

Words cannot easily describe the complex cornucopia of benefits to humans, wildlife, plant life and the surrounding bodies of water that this land provides. Greenbury Point is surrounded by Carr Creek, the Severn River, the Chesapeake Bay and Whitehall Bay. The Greenbury Point Nature Center, open Thursdays 11am-3pm, is located at the “main gate” to the large service road, which leads to the interior trails of Greenbury Point Conservation Area. The nature center is a showcase for the local fauna and flora of the conservation area and has its own little paths along Carr Creek. Adding a second golf course would literally be wiping away a critical, delicate, and environmentally pure landscape.

To see the colorful bounty of the conservation area, view the over 140 photos visitors have voluntarily and joyfully uploaded to the Google page for this special place. The Navy has its own website for Greenbury Point, which hardly does the place justice. Popular hiking websites, such as AllTrails, describe the wonders of the area and give it high marks. Then again, photos and video can barely capture the experience of Greenbury Point. The senses come alive during a spring or summer walk: the fragrance of the blossoming plant life, the chirping and singing of untold numbers and variety of birds, and then add the breezes that wash over your face and skin. In fall and winter, the chill, still and quiet experience is no less exhilarating to calm the chattering mind of any lucky soul who knows this hideaway.

Covid may have crippled us all for a while, and there are those who are still hurting today, but it is comforting to know that a place like Greenbury Point Conservation Area is available to anyone who needs it. For now.

The squeaky wheel gets the grease. Please help us to #savegreenburypoint

Photo and video credit: Mike Robinson

Riding, Hiking and Building Bacon Ridge

I have hiked and biked Bacon Ridge many times… but have only just started to explore all the awesome trails there. This is a gem and an excellent place to explore, merge with nature, get some exercise or just relax. As mentioned in the video, this is not just a place to mountain bike and there are many walkers and joggers sharing the trails.

On Google Maps

From Trailwerks:

TrailWerks is leading the charge on the first natural surface singletrack trail in Anne Arundel County! We’ve partnered with both MORE and Family Bike Shop to design and build a network of trails in Crownsville.

The Bacon Ridge Project has received support from Specialized Bicycles, Quality Bicycle Products, SC Logic, Scenic Rivers Land Trust, Family Veterinary Clinic and hundreds of volunteers. Without financial and volunteer support, trail construction at Bacon Ridge would not be possible.

  • Phase 1, 2.5 miles, began in August 2015 and is considered the pilot phase to verify that the soil conditions will be appropriate for trails.
  • Phase 2, 3.2 miles, was completed in December 2016 and extends north from Phase 1.
  • Phase 3 will connect the trail system to Farm Rd on the west side of the Crownsville Hospital complex and continue to move the trails into the northernmost sections of the property.

For more information, please email, call or stop by TrailWerks Cyclery! We do our best to keep maps up on the wall with current and future trail construction plans. If you would like to make a tax-deductible contribution to MORE for the Bacon Ridge Project. Donations larger than $500 should be mailed to MORE or dropped at TrailWerks to save processing fees.

MORE – Bacon Ridge
PO Box 2662
Fairfax VA 22031-0662

Follow the Bacon Ridge Project and TrailWerks Cyclery Facebook to get real-time information about what is going on out in the woods of Anne Arundel County!

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