Kayak launch spot review: Spriggs Farm Park

Spriggs Farm Park is located in Anne Arundel County on the Magothy River and is relatively new. Opening this park was promoted as a way to save this old farmland as open natural space for the local community and to provide public access to the Magothy River for those who want to canoe and kayak.

Bring your kayak, but unlock the gate first.

One of the unique features of this park is the locked gate. In order to enter the property, a kayaker must first obtain the combination from the county parks department. This combination is supposed to change every two months, so before you head out, you need to make sure you have the most recent numbers.  This can be done easily online here.

Kayaking on the Magothy River

The Magothy River is a large body of water and is heavily trafficked. That said, if you hug the shore, there are many creeks to explore. The video below shows my son and I kayaking in an area nearby Spriggs Farm Park.

Why kayak?

According to Outdoorplay.com, there are numerous reasons to kayak:

Because it’s Fun! When it comes down to the essential reason why people kayak it all comes back to this one reason. Paddling a kayak is fun! Do we really need any other reason to go kayaking?

Be Close to Nature. Kayaking definitely affords you the ability to be closer to nature than a lot of other activities do. In many cases you will be able to travel to and see sights only accessible to a very small percentage of the population.

Be with Friends (and family). The bond that fellow kayakers share is one that enhances friendships and builds camaraderie. Whether you and your friends share a competitive streak or just like to hang out, kayaking is for you.

See you on the water!

Tick removal trick and tips

This video below is an ingenious way to remove a live tick that has embedded itself. Tick removal can be tricky, since ticks are often so burrowed in that just pulling on the tick will result in leaving the head in the skin when the body snaps off.

Tick Removal with Cotton Swab

tick removal technique copy

View Video

In addition to the infamous Lyme Disease that is spread by ticks to campers, hikers and hunters each year, there are also numerous other bacterial infections that ticks can inflict. Early tick removal is very important, but what is even more important is tick prevention. Here are some tips to help keep you healthy.

  • Tape up your ankles, wrists and tuck/tape shirts to keep ticks from crawling in.
  • Use high strength tick spray
  • Check yourself in the shower as soon as you return home
  • Use a fine tooth comb on your hair when checking

I was bitten twice last year and had two Lyme Disease tests done, including tests for other infections. Nothing showed on the tests. Nonetheless, I later broke out in hives. The doctor was stumped. After a 21 day regimen of antibiotics, the hives vanished.

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks. (source: CDC)

 

More tips:

  • Wear light colored clothing, long sleeves and pants, tuck pants into socks. Long loose hair should be covered, braided or tied when venturing into areas where ticks are apt to be. Spray your clothing, etc.
  • When coming in from outside activities where you might have encountered ticks, throw clothing into the dryer set on high heat. This will ensure no ticks survive on your clothing. Remember to do a tick check, take a shower and wash your hair.
  • Keep pets that have outside exposure off furniture especially bedding.
  • Make certain that you have very fine pointed tweezers available.

Source: Stop Ticks On People

Turkey hunting video and helpful tips

This turkey hunting video below from Mossberg made me laugh in the beginning – when they threw rocks at the cow to move it.

Last season, there was a little red fox that kept running near my decoys. Eventually, the fox curled up and fell asleep in the field! It was so bad, I had to abandon my blind and decoys and walk in the woods to hunt. That fox was my saving grace! After calling for a few minutes in the timber, I found my Tom.

According to the National Wild Turkey Federation’s Brenda Valentine, to be successful, you need to “go hunting, make mistakes and figure it out.” I couldn’t agree more.

A good idea to prepare each season is to search YouTube for a wide variety of turkey hunting videos. YouTube has really become like a University of Hunting for many.

It also helps to have a simple turkey call, such as the Quaker Boy Easy Yelper.

The NWTF recommends the following:

  • Obtain a good gun, with a sling and proper ammo. Then practice patterning different turkey loads to ensure your gun is sighted in and you’ll make a clean, ethical kill.
  • Pack snacks and water to stay energized and hydrated.
  • Camouflage clothing and waterproof boots are also necessities and you may want to consider a turkey hunting vest to help organize your gear.

The fun and informative turkey hunting video below shows two hunting buddies, yukking it up and having a good time. As any deer hunter knows, being out on the hunt alone can be just as enjoyable – and even more rewarding. As far as hunting solo, Valentine says, “The benefit of hunting alone is you are learning so much more because the responsibility is on you… When you are by yourself, there is no intimidation. I find that people are intimidated about calling or messing up when they are with someone else, but when you are alone, if you screw up, oh well, do better next time. It’s encouraging to hunt alone.”

Enjoy the nice video by Mossberg and good luck this season.

Mossberg Turkey Hunting Video

 

 

Spring turkey season is upon us! Are you using a bow?

Spring Season – MD DNR
April 18–May 23
All counties
1 per day, 2 per season, bearded turkeys only

Who is hunting turkeys with a bow this year?

turkey 1

 

SOME TURKEY HUNTING SAFETY TIPS FROM MD DNR
Select a spot that is in open timber rather than thick brush: wearing camouflage clothing and eliminating movement is more critical to success than hiding in heavy cover.

Sit against a large stump, blow-down, tree trunk or rock that is wider than your shoulders and higher than your head when calling wild turkeys.

Remain still and speak in a loud, clear voice to announce your presence to other hunters if necessary. Never move, wave or make turkey sounds to alert another hunter of your presence.

 

Successful deer hunt with muzzleloader

Deer hunting in PG county, Maryland.

Successful hunt on Saturday: A large doe at 10AM in PG county from a tree stand with a T/C IMPACT muzzleloader. I have started using my muzzleloader instead of my Winchester 1300 smooth bore and rifled slugs. After considering a new rifled barrel slug shotgun because I wanted a more accurate gun for deer season, and dealing with a limited budget for a new gun, I bought the muzzleloader so I would have a longer season with muzzleloader season plus the regular firearms season. I had purchased a scope for this muzzleloader, but I have yet to hunt with the scope – the fiber optic iron sights have worked well in the woods. I put this doe down about 30-40 yards out from my stand with a shot to the lower neck, hitting the spine. The deer died quickly, going down right where I shot it. I won’t have trophy antlers with this deer, but I will have a decent amount of meat for the freezer.

 

 

 

Launch spot review: Homeport Farm Park

Homeport Farm Park, Anne Arundel County Maryland

This is a free park. See link and directions to this area. Some fun facts about Anne Arundel County, Maryland: The county has 520 miles of shoreline and most of its boundaries are defined by water, principally by the Chesapeake Bay to the east. Read more…

 

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